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ANARKOS RETURNS

Gregory Perrucci established Anarkos.

I had a coffee with Gregory at the London Wine Trade Fair recently. He seems to me how I like to think of myself, laid-back on the surface, but fiercely passionate about wine. He is a 4th generation wine producer and was fed up with the big names in the Italian Wine World planting vast areas of vines and taking them away to blend with and improve their more expensive DOCs (allegedly). Gregory’s desire was to return the wines to their origins. See website and video.

Just over ten years ago he produced his first vintage of 6000 bottles of Anarkos. Now he’s up to over 250,000 bottles! I first shipped the 2007 vintage to great critical acclaim;

The Daily Telegraph: “another one of Mark Hughes’ brilliant finds. Absolutely delicious blend of Primitivo, Negro Amaro and Malvasia. Lush and plush like velvet, also juicy, scented, intense, rich brimming with the smell of violets, deep purple plums and bitter cherries. Such a joy!

Oz Clarke as one of his 250 best wines of 2012: “an excellent example of how southern Italian reds are starting to express their own fabulous originality. It’s bulging with youth and it’s soft, yet tempered by a nice edgy bitterness.” 

£9.99 Anarkos is now our best-selling red wine, so, oozing with confidence that joyous reds from the unfashionable south of Italy can sell I have also shipped from the Estate a real show-stopper called “Fellone”, it’s £16.00 worth of 100% Primitivo, and I’m going to give away a bottle with every case of Anarkos pre-sold as the stock makes its way up through Italy to us here at RWC. For those of you who already know and love Anarkos it’s a no brainer. If you haven’t yet sampled the delights, then maybe the free bottle will help you make that decision to get in a case.

Pre-shipment Anarkos case with Free bottle of Fellone. £119.88 Buy Now

The label is attention-seeking, as is the bright red plastic cork (not my favourite closure, I must admit, but the wine insisted I buy it!). The wine has attitude and is a provocative one, railing against the plight of the region (see their website). The region reminds me of the Languedoc in France – loads of rubbish wines but increasing numbers of fanatics making really top wines as they should be made. This was one of my favourite winery visits. The wine is made from a blend of the local varieties Primitivo, Negro Amaro and Malvasia Nera and should be consumed in conspiratorial bars in the south of Italy with huge helpings of pasta.

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